LFF2017: First Time Up

What’s the best part of going to a film festival? The endless discussion in the queues? The wealth of talented filmmakers presenting themselves for Q&As and talks? The booze? Close, but no. For me it is the chance of discovering a diamond; of watching a filmmaker’s first offering and knowing you could enjoy their movies…

LFF2017: Brits at home

It’s a weird time to be British, right? Brexit, rising xenophobia, a governing party with the competence of a drunk baby trying to conduct major surgery. And yet we still have our artists. British filmmakers are amongst the finest in the world, & over recent years at LFF have showcased brave, innovative work. This year…

London Film Festival 2017: Catch them first

You can’t start Christmas festivities until Halloween is out the way. But when can you start the Halloween fun? For me it’s after the preceding major event is done, and that’s London Film Festival. The 2017 edition is almost upon us; some of you may not have selected your cinematic gifts, whether for your nearest…

LFF2017: Female directors

The good news: a quarter of the films at this year’s LFF were directed by women! The bad news: a quarter of the films at this year’s LFF were directed by women. Yes, it’s a step in the right direction, but we’re still a long way off. And no, boneheads, we don’t want an exact…

Top 5: Returning heroes at #LFF

In its 60th edition and boasting 18 different sections, the London Film Festival is the perfect platform for filmmakers to develop their voice. The festival holds a heritage and reputation that promotes those involved, and a range of categories that allows directors to express their stories on almost any topic. Many have come back several…

Anomalisa Review

It’s a Charlie Kaufman film, so it should be no surprise that Anomalisa playfully considers our beliefs and expectations. And yet it manages to offer up an experience even hardened cinema-goers will not expect. Given the endless possibilities afforded in a CGI age, it is a shame that animation is so frequently used in the service of robots hitting each…

The Lobster Review

If you had to die and become an animal, what animal would you be? It sounds like the discussion topic that comes with the joke in a Christmas cracker. For Yorgos Lanthimos it is the idea from which he explores love, emotions and the pressures of conformity in his dark, dry fifth feature The Lobster. David…

TrailerTime: Sunset Song

Few cinematic experiences are as comforting as a British period piece; the warm familiarity of costumes, setting and language are known to audiences across the world. Terence Davies’ first film since 2011’s The Deep Blue Sea plays on the popularity of this genre to tell a coarser tale than some might expect, that of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s classic…

LFF 2015: Suffragette Review

Today’s films retell history with a startling immediacy. Major world events have barely begun when screen rights are being negotiated. In this context, the freshness and invigorating pace of Sarah Gavron’s Suffragette is all the more remarkable given the century that has passed since its stories took place. The film is centred around Maud Watts (Carey Mulligan), a…

Top 5: BFI London Film Festival

It was Samuel Johnson who said ‘When a person is tired of London Film Festival, they are tired of life’ – or something like that. Even the dictionary-writing Mr Johnson would be impressed by the encyclopaedia of titles on show at this year’s event, which runs from 7-18th October at several locations around the capital….