Preview: Free Fire

Ben Wheatley is one of the most inventive directors making films right now. From family crime drama Down Terrace through horror hit Kill List, my personal favourite Sightseers and psychological Civil War thriller A Field In England, he has an astonishingly high level of quality and originality. Mr Wheatley currently has two films in the…

Slow West Review

The images of Slow West, the first film from former Beta Band member John Maclean, are so beautiful and arresting that they seem hand-painted. Every aspect of the film has the mark of artistry about it, from the stunning landscapes to authentic costumes and believable, honest performances. Whether you are a committed cinephile or casual viewer, it…

’71 Review

Yann Demange’s ’71 is a thriller set in Northern Ireland at the height of the Troubles. It is an astoundingly tense film that uses its historical template to analyse the intricacies of conflict, but also wider themes of loyalty, trust and the corrupting nature of partisanship. The narrative centres on Gary Hook, a young British – and English…

A Most Wanted Man Review

A Most Wanted Man is the fifth feature film from Dutch director Anton Corbjin, and is notable for one of the last performances of a modern cinematic great, the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. It is fitting that, in one of his final screen appearances, the immensely talented Hoffman is far and away the best thing about…

Pride Review

The death of narrative cinema is constantly proclaimed and, with another summer of superhero blockbusters behind us, it can feel like the proclaimers are right. But every now and then comes a film that reinforces belief in the importance, nay, the necessity of storytelling. Pride is one such film. Prepare yourselves, this review might be…

The Guest Review

One moment at the beginning of Adam Wingard’s The Guest captures the forte of the film very well. Anna Peterson (Maika Monroe) is questioned on David, the titular visitor to her family abode. She tersely replies, ‘I said he seemed nice, I didn’t say I liked him’. It is on this distinction between charm and…

Mood Indigo Review

Michel Gondry is nothing if not unpredictable. This is the guy who directed Jim Carrey as a romantic lead & expressed Noam Chomsky in animated form. In viewing his adaptation of Boris Vian’s surreal 1947 novel L’Écume des jours, could anyone know what to expect? The surface of Mood Indigo therefore seems somewhat conventional; a romantic comedy…

Truth and illusion. Who knows the difference, eh, toots?

  This is my blog. There is no need to panic, it is just my blog. Here recorded will be a disparate collection of thoughts that exist and then exit my head. I intend to write mostly about films, those wonderful vacations from the quotidian labour of reality. There will also be food, feminism, football…